National Banks Improve the Customer Experience

Across the bank industry—from large national banks to small regional and community institutions—the customer satisfaction momentum in 2016 is positive. Banks overall surge 5.3% to a score of 80 on the ACSI’s 100-point scale. This rising trend is one of the more surprising results from the ACSI’s report on the Finance and Insurance sector as it holds true across nearly every big bank.

Smaller size, however, continues to distinguish the top tier as community banks and credit unions remaining pacesetters. In general, more personalized service and the ability to offer lower fees make for happier customers. Nevertheless, both super regional banks and national banks post substantial gains, with the latter moving up 6.9% to 77.

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ACSI data show that big banks are making progress toward improving the customer experience. From the variety of financial services available to call center operations, national banks earn better ratings compared with a year ago. The critical website user experience is deemed more satisfying (up 2% to an ACSI benchmark of 85), but community bank websites set the pace at 88. When it comes to face-to-face contact, small banks earn the top mark for courtesy and helpfulness (91)—a level of excellence that staff at big banks have yet to attain (86).

Among the largest U.S. commercial banks, Citibank heads the field in 2016 with a 12% leap to 82, a score that rivals the satisfaction level of credit unions and nearly matches smaller community banks.

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Wells Fargo slips out of first place for customer satisfaction not by suffering an ACSI decline, but by showing less improvement than its competitors. Adding just 1% to an ACSI score of 76, Wells Fargo is now below average. Closing in on Wells Fargo, Bank of America (+10%) and Chase (+6%) are tied at 75.

Stock performance for big banks mimics their ACSI changes. Since February, Chase, Citibank, and Bank of America have each shown solid gains, whereas Wells Fargo’s stock lagged its national competitors even before news of improper sales practices broke.

ACSI Finance and Insurance Report 2016 »

Media Post:  Citibank Leads National Banks In Study »

Health Insurers Doing a Better Job at Basics

The health insurance industry is getting better at meeting policyholder needs as satisfaction rises 4.3% to 72 on ACSI’s 100-point scale. Among the big insurers, Aetna and Anthem tie for first place at 75 after posting large gains. Kaiser Permanente follows closely at 74, with Humana inching up to meet the industry average at 72. At the low end, Cigna trails the field at 67 despite earning this year’s biggest increase in policyholder satisfaction. This positive momentum is tempered by the fact that health insurers remain in the bottom dozen among 43 ACSI industries.

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Nevertheless, ACSI data show that the industry is making strides in key areas of the customer experience. Policyholders are the most pleased with access to primary care doctors (ACSI benchmark of 80, up from 78 in 2015). Claims are easier to submit and coverage of standard medical procedures is viewed more favorably. Call centers also receive a higher rating, but show ample room for improvement (73).

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TIME/Money: Americans Are Actually Happier With Their Health Insurance Companies Now Than They Were Two Years Ago »

D Healthcare Daily: Despite Rising Costs, Americans Report More Satisfaction With Insurance Plans »

Sears: Will it be Lights Out or Back in the Groove with Customers?

Sears, once a stalwart American brand, is currently a shadow of its former self, having fallen on hard times with both shoppers and investors alike. Back in 2001, Sears was tied for second among department and discount stores in terms of customer satisfaction, according to the American Customer Satisfaction Index. Since then, the chain has managed to beat the industry average only once in 14 subsequent years.

Looking at the last decade of ACSI scores and stock performance for Sears, the period from 2009 to 2013 shows customer satisfaction trending upward by 4% while stock price falls over 57%. The reason for this outcome lies in the connection between stable, or even increasing, customer satisfaction and a dwindling customer base.

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Customer satisfaction plays a vital role in competitive industries in large part because consumers can vote with their feet. That is, customers who do not like a company’s service can simply go elsewhere. The ACSI measures a company’s customer satisfaction by talking directly to the customers themselves. In situations where unhappy consumers leave en masse, the only remaining customers are the ultra-loyal.

In the case of Sears, these loyal customers are likely patronizing the store for reasons other than satisfaction, such as price, proximity, or tradition. In such situations, a rise in customer satisfaction can indeed coincide with a decrease in revenues—a red flag in terms of future financial performance. As dissatisfied customers defect to competitors, the diminished pool of customers includes a greater percentage of shoppers who like the experience for a specific reason. During the period 2009 to 2013, the rise in customer satisfaction for Sears coincides with a steady depletion in sales.

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In recent years, even the most loyal Sears shoppers have seen their satisfaction decline. The company now ranks second-to-last among department and discount stores. With an ACSI score of 71, Sears beats only Wal-Mart at the low level of 66. In comparison, industry leaders Nordstrom and Dillard’s score 80 or higher. It is no surprise to see Sears report terrible earnings for the third quarter of 2016. For Sears, the challenge ahead lies with improving the customer experience. Unless the company succeeds in becoming more customer-centric, it is unlikely that Sears’ faltering financial position will turn around.